Collaborative Concepts
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2014

The Farm Project 2014
(Click artist name to navigate directly)

 


Anna Adler (Field V)
Elizabeth Barksdale (Field I)
John Belardo (Field II)
Ben Birillo (Field I)
John BonSignore (Field II)
Cindy Booth* (Field III)
Lorene Bouboushian (H) (E)
Kaia Gilje & Paige Fredlund

Jo-Ann Brody (Field V)
Susan Buroker (Field II)
Jodi Carlson (Field I)
John Carruthers & (Field III)
Storm King School **
Diana Carulli (Field IV)
Steven Ceraso (Field III)
Ada Cruz (Field V)
Augie DellaVecchia (Field III)
decomposer (E)
Robert Ladislas Derr (T)

Jeanne Egel* (Field III)
Andrea Elam (H)
Florencia Escudero (Field I)
Carol Flaitz (Field IV)
Denis Folz (Field III)
Marcy B. Freedman (E)
C. Robert Friedman (Field V)
Barbara Galazzo (Field V)
with Cobly Meagle
Ruth Hardinger (Field I)
Sarah Haviland (Field III)
Barney Hodes (Field II)
Cathrin Hoskinson (Field II)
Eric Jacobson (Field I)

Joseph Jaskolka (Field III)
Thom Joyce (Field III)
Team K-M (T)
Matt Keeney, Erin McNally

Dieter Kuhn (Field III)
Kevin Laverty (Field III)
Lisa Levy (T)
David Link (Field I)
Jim Lloyd (Field I)
Brook Maher (Field V)
Lynne Mayocole (Field III)
James Mulvaney (Field IV)
Michael Natiello (Field III)
Jerome Harris Parmet (Field III)
Francine Perlman (Field V)
David Provan (Field III)
Winn Rea (Field V)
Sheilah Rechtschaffer (Field V)
Karen Roff (Field V)
Herman Roggeman (Field III)
Mario Rusich (Field IV)
Peter Schlemowitz (Field III)
Fred Schlitzer (Field II)
Nathaniel Sullivan (H)
Hideki Takahashi (Field V)
Naomi Teppich (Field I)
Jim Thomson (Field IV)
Alex Uribe (Field III)
Chuck von Schmidt (Field III)
Eva Whorley (Field IV)
Ellen Wilkinson (Field II)
Max Yawney (Field III)

*Collaborators

 


Anna Adler (Field V)


Lost Landscape
Ceramic & Mixed Media
Variable size

Lost Landscape alerts us to the existence of creatures once native to the New York area, now extinct, extirpated, or endangered. In this slightly bizarre, fictionalized tableau we can see a glimpse of a landscape from another time and contemplate the changes in our fragile ecosystem. Unfortunately, humans are most often at the root of its destruction.
“All that lives beneath Earth’s fragile canopy is, in some elemental fashion, related. Is born, moves, feeds, reproduces, dies. Tiger and turtle dove; each tiny flower and homely frog; the running child, father to the man and, in ways as yet unknown, brother to the salamander. If mankind continues to allow whole species to perish, when does their peril also become ours?” --- World Wildlife Fund.

Carolina Parakeet, Conuropsis carolinensis STATUS: Extinct
American Burying Beetle, Nicrophorus americanus STATUS: Endangered, extirpated in New York area
Karner Blue Butterfly, Lycaeides melissa samuelis STATUS: Endangered

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Elizabeth Barksdale (Field I)


Paint Tag
Plywood & PVC
8' x 25' x 25'

Paint Tag is named for my experiences making this sculpture with my children and their friends. I created the original design sketching sculpture ideas with my kids. When it came time to build, two of their friends came to help. All of the children helped cut panels with a jig saw. For each, it was their first experience using the tool and it was very exciting for them.
My daughter, Raven, and her friend Ruby, both 9 years old, designed and painted several of the panels. My son, Davin, 7 years old, painted several panels. Alex, Ruby’s brother, 12 years old, chose to spend his time exclusively with the jig saw. Prudent perhaps, because in the end, the younger children descended from concentrating on organized painting into messy childish bliss, a change brought on when my son stood up and suddenly declared “Paint Tag!” As you can well imagine, paint madness ensued.

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John Belardo (Field II)


Geo-Skull
Laser cut steel, wood
65” x 50” x 50”

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Ben Birillo (Field I)


Little Goat
Wood, paint
6' x 6' x 4'

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John BonSignore (Field II)


Tumbleweed Firma
Blue stone and steel
3’ x 4’ x 1.6”

The design of my sculpture begins with a broad concept: a place, person, animal, or emotion. After paring away the inconsequential details, what remains is the unique core of my subject. The unprocessed forms of stone are my primary medium; like the ideas I am interpreting, they are clean and uncomplicated.
The process is the same throughout my work: to capture that singular core that makes any place, feeling or living thing what it is. My sculptures become the physical representations of the essence of the subject.

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Cindy Booth and Jeanne Egel (Field III)


Cow Wash
Brushes/Brooms, Wood
10' x 5 1/2' x 20'

We are approaching the idea of public art with the idea that cattle and steed are our public. These sculptures have the primary residence of Saunders Fields in mind. They are meant to be touched, caressed, pushed, and walked into and used as scratching posts (for cows and horses). Materials for these pieces are recycled brushes from street sweepers.
Although mechanical in their former life, these sculptures have whimsy and lightness as their foundation, as well as the idea of behavioral enrichment for any bovine that may interact with them.

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Jo-Ann Brody (Field V)


Disparate Women
Cycladic Take, Fossilcrete, 59" x 16" x 12"
Contemporary Take, Fossilcrete, clay, 73" x 16" x 12"

The conflation of creativity/fertility makes new sense with the inner figures in my current work. My newest granddaughter was just born this July. The inner/outer surfaces reflect my background in clay. They are birth to fully formed creatures: not holding or embracing but containing them. Are they fully fledged or broken fragments taking shelter?
The child is the father of the man; the muse the mother of new creation.
The formal elements include the stark contrast of creamy white and black, the relationship between inside and outside, the rhythm of the figures inside.
Working in cement is a slow regular pattern of mixing, applying, and evaluating that creates an atmosphere of contemplation: who I am, what I’ve accomplished in my life, and where I still can go. And then suddenly the piece speaks to me—telling me where it wants to go. The farm gives me a chance to experiment that I get nowhere else.

joannbrody.wordpress.com

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Susan Buroker (Field II)


Altered Earth, Synthetic nitrogen farming; the consequential machine
Metal and wood
10' x 6' x 4'

Altered Earth was inspired by the struggle to feed the growing population of the world in the late nineteenth century. This led to the introduction of synthetic nitrogen farming to increase crop yield. Over half of our population today is fed with the dependency on nitrogen fertilizer. Nitrogen fertilizer not absorbed by crops travels through water, soil, and air leading to contamination affecting our environment and human health.
Altered Earth represents the struggle with the imbalance of feeding the world and protecting our fragile ecosystem. The metal disks represent the nitrogen, symbolizing the contrast between the organic earth and the chemical that erodes it.

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Jodi Carlson (Field I)


Life Is Too Short To Be Little
Aluminum, steel
7' (w) x 6' (d) x 13' (h)

“Life is too short to be little,” Benjamin Disraeli wrote. He continued with the sentiment that people are never so human as when they feel deeply, act boldly, and express themselves with frankness and with fervor. I will never forget how I felt on my first day of welding a metal sculpture--like my heart had opened up. Creating sculptures gave me a vehicle to act boldly and express myself with fervor. I am so grateful.

This sculpture uses a 300 gallon oil tank flipped onto its side as a vase for a bouquet of flowers. Lilies were created using expanded aluminum and aluminum diamond plate--materials more often used in commercial applications. And colorful, randomly curled elements were added, like garnish. Inside the oil tank is a 3-layer grid which allows stem-like tubes to be arranged, like flowers, in a myriad of arrangements.

Be inspired to “go big,” and act boldly. It’s worth the effort.

www.jodicarlson.com

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Storm King School, Student Work; John Carruthers (Field III)


Spinning Profile
Plywood, paint
61" x 50"

The Storm King School (SKS) is a small boarding school in Cornwall-on-Hudson, emphasizing real world experiences, experiential education, and community involvement. This collaboration could not have been a more perfect fit for those goals. Spinning Profile is an outline of a human face seen from 2 angles, forming a 3-D sculpture. It appears that the head is spinning and looking everywhere. It is a metaphor for what students do during their time at SKS. Spinning Profile was built by students after they created maquettes. The winning design was by Victoria Bobrova, a 9th grader. Dr. Nicole Shea of the Eisenhower Leadership Center contacted Storm King School about collaboraing on a community project. As the Co-Chair of the Art Department, John Carruthers thought the Farm Project would be a natural. The students visited the Polich-Tallix foundry in Rock Tavern, NY, and all had all been to the Storm King Sculpture Park, so they were excited about the possibility of building a larger piece for an open-air, “sculpture park-like” exhibit.

www.sks.org

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Diana Carulli (Field IV)


Attachment 3 (TO Attachment)
1Approx 11’ x 22’ x 4’
Rusted Steel, Almaloy and Galvanized Wire

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Steven Ceraso (Field III)


Wing Bench Form
Wood and Steel
2' x 14' x 1'

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Ada Cruz (Field V)


Seer
Clay and mixed media
24" x 12" x 8" (approximation)

In folklore and in traditions of shamanic practice, a Seer sees the past, the present and, perhaps, the future. Often, a Seer is considered to be a person whose actions, attitudes and comportment are outside what may be considered “Normal” behavior, or rather, “deviant,” foreign or “alien.” This sculpture holds a mirror at eye level for the viewer to reflect on. Who is the Seer? It is my ninth year participating with Collaborative Concepts at Saunders Farm, and my fifth year putting together a small installation at the Farm’s “megalith.” As I reflect on the origin of this piece–exhibited first at “Deviants, Perverts, Aliens and Feminazis,” a collaborative the Ceres Gallery members and Vistas Latinas that confronted the absurdity of the terms given women and, in our case, artists by people like Rush Limbaugh–it seemed appropriate, indeed, site specific, to hang Seer as a necklace for the ancient stone.

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Augie DellaVecchia (Field III)


Art for Arthur's Sake
Golf clubs, metal screen, paint
6' x 4' x 1'

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Florencia Escudero (Field I)


Jinja
Rope, wood, glitter, plastic
120" x 57” x 3"

I hope to create surfaces and moments for the investigation of perception and the ever-changing physicality of material in the world. I take into account light, color, touch, and the impossible task of holding onto the moment. My most recent work has focused on the production of flexible, portable objects such as hammocks. The hammock pieces are a combination of plastic and when they are displayed they can take on the qualities of stained glass creating the illusion of the reflection of water.

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Carol Flaitz (Field IV)


Your Soul is Not in Your Shoes
PVC piping, polymer clay, polymer resin
10' x 8" x 4"

The concept of this piece is a visceral humorous portrayal regarding the absurdities that fashion dictates for young women to the point that they are willing to damage their bodies. I have observed over the years the pain that women endure and the consequent damage to their feet, ankles, and spine through wearing 4-6 inch heels for hours and days on end. The purpose is to shift the way that the female walks, and at the lengthening of her legs to portray elegance and sexuality. Unfortunately, the result is a woman who cannot walk quickly, who often is in pain, and, if this continues for years, foot, ankle and spine damage result. Furthermore, Barbie as a physical ideal given to little girls enforces this concept. She needs a stand to stand!!! My message is for my daughters and the next generation of women.

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Denis Folz (Field III)


The Last Piece of Wood
Steel and Wood
7' x 7' x 4'

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C. Robert Friedman (Field V)


CONVERSATIONS
Clay, natural wood fire glaze and commercial glazes
Dimensions variable

Art provides both the viewer and the artist with new ways of seeing themselves and the world around them. The medium I use to express this is clay. In my relationship with it, I continually seek to integrate the four basic elements of life (earth, fire, water, and air) and blend them into compositions of human attitudes and emotions. Frequently ambiguous in form, androgynous in character, yet easily accessible, each piece I create is meant to draw the viewer into an intimate and involving relationship.

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Barbara Galazzo and intern, Colby Meagle (Field V)


Untitled
Mixed media mosaics
3 1./2' x 3' x 1'

These mosaic crystals are what I imagine to be lying under Saunders Farm’s rich soil. Researchers at the University of Southampton announced that they are able to store and retrieve huge amounts of five-dimensional data on quartz crystals. They have named it “Superman memory crystal” – after the “memory crystals” used as storing devices in the Superman films. They claim that using ultra-fast lasers, we can now encode a piece of quartz with 5D information in the form of nano-structured dots separated by only one-millionth of a meter. If true, then the storage allows unprecedented parameters including 360 TB/ disc data capacity, thermal stability up to 1000°C ,and practically unlimited lifetime. Now, this wonderful discovery that enables us to store huge amount of data that can be retrieved even after millions of years, makes us think about the possibility of our ancestors doing the same, hoping we would retrieve it someday.

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Ruth Hardinger (Field I)


Continuous Draw #8, Sequester
Rope, concrete and cardboard
approx 35' x 30' x 40'

A volumetric space, outlined by ropes, is in the farm where trees, wildflowers, plants, birds, insects, and more species live. Continuous Draw #8, Sequester, is in this region of trees that sequester carbon. Anchored in opposite sides of the triangle, the concrete rings, centered between the tree-trunks’ V-shaped spread, are likened to rings of worry beads or markers of time. A large strand of rope holding cardboard boxes marks the entrance. During the exhibition’s time frame, the cardboard box gate will deform and modify by nature’s processes including rain, wind, sun, and cold. This installation could be called a short-lived forcing of change, which echoes my concerns about the speed of what is happening as our climate changes.

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Sarah Haviland (Field III)


Hirondelle
Reinforced Forton MG cement
51” x 48” x 48”

I am fascinated by human-bird hybrids, expressive personas existing in a parallel world to our own. Hirondelle is the newest in a family of bird-figures, this one resembling a blue, red-breasted swallow ready to take wing. These sculptures are inspired by the long history of mythological figures relating to the soul, found in images and tales from cultures worldwide. Along with large cement and resin sculptures like Hirondelle, based on specific portraits, I make small bird-size figures in ceramic, Aqua-resin, and bonded metals.

www.sarahhaviland.com

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Barney Hodes (Field II)


YUKO YOSHIDA, approx 3' X 4' X 18'
CHERRY FU, approx. 3' X 3' X 18'
NATALIA, Approx. 30" X 24" X 15'
All three cement

As to statements, Matisse once said that artists should have their tongues pulled out because if the work doesn’t say it, what does? I’d like to keep mine, so instead of making a statement I’d ask a question, “How do we see people of an ethnicity different from our own? As individuals with characteristics that are uniquely their own, or as representatives primarily of their “own kind”?

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Cathrin Hoskinson (Field II)


To the Other Side of the Horizon Line/For Eric
Mirrored plexiglass and stainless steel
8” x 10” x ½”

To Eric Arctander, an enthusiastic organizer of the Farm project with the Collaborative Concepts team, who passed away suddenly last year. His cheerful presence is deeply missed by everyone at Saunders Farm this year. To me he was synonymous with the fun of the event, which I treasure for the opportunity to experiment in an inspiring setting with few creative restrictions. He seemed to be everywhere and I had the impression he liked everyone’s work, every year, and of course one was inspired by his efforts to help with the organization of the show. Of my own projects he had been most fond of a stainless steel sailboat that I mounted on a tree branch several years ago. Although the cows liked to push it over, I have a wonderful photo of my intention, which was to express the hopeful feeling of the future, as seen from the top of the ridge and over the waves of the distant hills. So this year I am returning to this theme and have made another boat, smaller in scale–farther away–suggesting the dimension that we cannot see where the spirit and energy of those who have left us still reside.

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Eric Jacobson (Field I)


Waves
Brass and copper tubing, stainless steel cable, dye patina
84” (h) x 48” (w) x 81” (d)

The work consists of curved “lines drawn in space,” interacting with one another, and defining space. It was important to me to incorporate color, movement, and sound. Relationships change as the brightly colored elements move in the wind. Sound brings another sensory field into play. The dyed copper and brass tubing clang as the pieces collide. The piece is inspired by living, organic forms: vines, tree branches, underwater plants. When the wind passes through the elements of the sculpture, it affects them but does not alter them. Inspired by Calder mobiles and Kandinsky paintings, I am exploring the concept of three-dimensional painting, in which the curving copper tubes form the painted “lines” and define positive and negative space.

www.jacobsonsculpture.com

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Joseph Jaskolka (Field III)


The Elemental
Black Granite, River Stone, New England Field Stone, Connecticut Micah, Steel, Fire, Water, and Wind.
8.5' x 6.5' x 6'

The Elemental is a basic yet complex presentation of the four Classical Elements, embodied into one being. Anything at all, that can be experienced in any way, will have elemental qualities that can be sensed and responded to. If this is true, the elements can be understood as the fundamental basis of the relationships between extant things, the source of shared qualities, the root level of correspondences that ultimately form the orderly, coherent, and therefore predictable world. As one's awareness of the elemental qualitties of things increase, the world appears more predictable. To me, The Elemental is an image of someone who has mastered the recognition of elemental qualities, from the most simple to the most intricate, therefore mastering life itself.

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Thom Joyce (Field III)


Cow Catcher
Welded steel

My art is a pure expression of my joy and my insane approach to life. I create each piece with an idea in mind but I allow the creative process to take me on a journey. The sculpture itself tells me when its done. I had a larger vision for Cow Catcher but while setting up the connection of the top to the tower, I realized that what I had was the finished piece. I have cast, welded, bent, cut, and found metal to bring my vision to life. I had not been focusing on sculpting for a while and, with this new piece, my love of the process has been rekindled.

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Kevin Laverty (Field III)


Untitled
Wood and plastic
14' (h) with variable dimensions in all directions

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Stargazer
Wood
6’ x 3’ x 1 1/2’

Inspired by the Minimalist Art Movement of the 1970s, David seeks to continue in the tradition of “Less is More,” where harmony, peace of mind, and balance combine like the statues of Buddha in meditation. Effective use of color and negative space further enhance the strength and power of his work.

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Jim Lloyd (Field I)


Peaceable Kingdom
Welded steel
9' (h) by variable

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Brook Maher (Field V)


DRIP DRY
Metal, rope, clothespins

Textiles are among my favorite forms of artistic expression. Color, pattern, texture, line, form, and detail challenge the bountiful inventiveness and craftsmanship of the creators who are, more often than not, anonymous women. Textiles are both practical and necessary, yet also can be wildly or subtly expressive. Clothing is personal and my artwork always comes back to the personal.
The Saunders Farm show provides an ideal venue for experimenting with new media. I have been spending a lot of time in the past few years at my home away from home in Taos. New Mexico has a long tradition of metalworking, including decorative objects of pierced tin and copper. When I began to render most of the garments for my clothesline from flexible sheets of aluminum, they required something more to give them definition and personality. I used a hammer and nail and a screwdriver to pierce and make impressions on the metal, mimicking needlework. I wanted the garments on the line to “read” as three-dimensional without actually being so.
Drip Dry is also meant to be enhanced by the natural environment, reflecting changing light and colors from the sky and adjacent foliage and making a kind of music as the garments dance in the wind.

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Lynne Mayocole (Field III)


A Small Ghost for Eric
Mixed
7’ x 2’ x 2’ (includes base)

My Small Ghost for Eric is a memorial piece for Eric Arctander. He was my sponsor last year at Saunders but died shortly after the middle of the exhibition. I first knew Eric when we were both artist adjuncts at Bronx Community College many years ago. Our lives wove in and out since then, most spectacularly a few years ago when he facilitated my and my partner’s trip to an amazing adventure in Provence. I painted the base of my sculpture with motifs from that area.

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James Mulvaney (Field IV)


Untitled
Wood studs
140" x 48" x 69"

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Michael Natiello (Field III)


Carousel Carcass
Mixed Media
Approximately 8’ x 3’ x 2’

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Jerome Harris Parmet (Field III)


PISCES DENIED
Welded Painted Steel
72" x 36” x 24”

My artistic mode of expression is specifically steel sculpture– the strength and durability of the material versus its surprising liquidity and malleability fascinates me. I want my art to speak for itself from my feelings to the viewer’s emotions. Therefore, I work primarily without a preconceived plan or concept, as the outpouring of absorbed experience plays a major role in guiding my hands and achieving their goals. I might say it’s almost spiritual.

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Francine Perlman (Field V)


There Once Was a Gazebo
Wood and paper
7' x 7' x 7'

Conceived as a gazebo, my work was hopeful about the possibility of peace in the West Bank. But during its development, the entire Middle East met calamity after catastrophe, and the piece changed accordingly. I could no longer festoon its surfaces with colorful Palestinian and Israeli cultural icons. It’s still a quiet piece, because I am still a minimalist, but I’m hoping it causes people to reflect, to be moved, and to ask–what does she mean by that? as I have been moved to ask myself. I hoped that by calling it There Once Was a Gazebo, people would know I meant there was a peaceful place and now there isn’t, and I hoped that the two newspaper photos in the piece would convey that I am now talking about Gaza without telling people what to think. But not everyone is as obsessed with that part of the world as I am, so if people don’t get the narrative, I think the aesthetic solution stands on its own, a very important aspect of all my work – room-like, lines, shadows.

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David Provan (Field III)


The Fifth Noble Truth
PVC pipe, steel armature
28’ high

The Fifth Noble Truth is a direct response to the demands of the Saunders Farm site, as filtered through my perception, skills, and biases. I understood the site to require: Monumentality (to be seen within the vast expanses of the Farm, it is 28 feet high); Durability (to withstand wind, rain, and cows, it’s fabricated from super-stable PVC pipe, over a steel armature); Colorfulness (to stand out in the overpowering greenness of the place, it is painted the full spectrum of Rustoleum spray paint, excluding green); and Cheapness.
The title, The Fifth Noble Truth, refers to an addendum to the Four Noble Truths of Buddhism that occurred to me while designing and building the sculpture: “Can one desire to be free of desire?”

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Winn Rea (Field V)


Displacement/Flow: Hudson Highlands, 2014
Found branches, chair, twine
15’ x 20’ x 12’

Displacement/Flow: Hudson Highlands, 2014, is one in a series of temporary environmental sculptures where a chair is a stand-in for human presence in nature. Found branches are lashed together, arcing up and around a chair wedged between the twin trunks of a tree. The fluidity of the arc juxtaposed with the visual compression of the twin trunks are a metaphor for the complex relationship between humans and nature. Winn Rea’s environmental, process-based art includes sculpture, video installation, and works on paper. Her work, exhibited nationally and internationally from New York, to Grand Rapids, to Seoul, has been reviewed in The New York Times, Geijutsu- Shincho, (a monthly Japanese contemporary Art magazine,) The Huffington Post, and AlterNet. Rea is Associate Professor of Art at Long Island University—Post, Brookville, New York.

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Sheilah Rechtschaffer (Field V)


Gaza
White plastic shrink wrap on a dead tree, bricks, cement, dirt, various discarded items
Approximately 14'

A stunted tree remains from last year. Its awkward shape seems brutal. Life over. Covered in white plastic, the shrouded tree is a symbol of an uncertain future. At the base are scattered remains from blown-up buildings. What isn’t there is the blood and the smell. The decades of this endless conflict go by. The violence increases and the latest news is a ceasefire. We become either anesthetized or obsessively seek newest information. We can do little. But we can bear witness. We can empathize and we can speak out against this human catastrophe and say “not in our name.” And we can hope that the latest ceasefire can lead to justice.

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Karen Roff (Field V)


The Grove
Recycled and new plywood, branches
22" x 33" x 72" approximately

The Grove is a cluster of five separate tree-like shapes that share a communal base. The name of the sculpture evokes the memory of the places in the woods that we explored when we were children, and discovered wild undisturbed settings that all possessed a distinct specificity, unlike the ‘manufactured’ landscapes of the suburbs that are not really natural or unique. The fabricated aspect of the piece is a reference to this human intervention upon the landscape, but also recalls how we would spend hours constructing little mini environments out of natural and synthetic materials. Close observation of the work reveals that what from a distance looked homogeneous is actually an accumulation of similar but disparate sections of wood from diverse sources, hand cut and stained, which when combined integrate the past into the present and create a new unity. The original objects include a plywood side panel from a backyard playset that we made for our daughter, sections of old art projects formerly painted metallic silver, and random panels from the garden, making the trees fragmented and irregular, like memory that is incomplete and disjointed, bits of substance in a non-linear sequence.

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Herman Roggeman (Field III)


Aquarium
Steel, plexiglas, paint

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Mario Rusich (Field IV)


Passage
Bamboo and twine
10’ x 4’ x 12’

Passage tries to evoke and suggest the transition that we have to make at this point in our universal history. By using natural materials my work tries to embrace and reconnect to the organic underpinnings that make us part and not separate from nature– all that has been lost by our modern, post-industrial worship and total reliance upon empirical, analytical, and the scientific way of life. We have become completely separated from “nature” and our part in it.

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Peter Schlemowitz (Field III)


Loop The Loop
Painted Plywood
20’ x 21’ x 13’

Loop the Loop is a culmination of four interests: large-scale, endless sculpture, use of color in sculpture, cable-based sculptural support systems, and sculpture as a constructivism or assemblage of independent sculptural elements. The colors, inspired by a restricted De Stijl palette and the organically shaped forms relate to the formal vocabulary of my past pieces. The cable support structure is based on the truss bridge design model. This piece’s composition, in contrast to my earlier large-scale sculptures which are composed of closed obliquely connected shapes, is composed of a series of parallel open shapes that are not directly connected to each other.

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Fred Schlitzer (Field II)


Old Man Flying a Kite
Steel
7 1/2’ x 4’ x 1’

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Hideki Takahashi (Field V)


Columns
Special acrylic on Denim canvas
10’ x 9’ each

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Naomi Teppich (Field I)


Cactus Conundrum 2013
Steel rebar, steel mesh, cement, cement enamel
66” x 46” x 31”

My sculpture is a linear outline of a saguaro cactus. I have been attracted to this dry weather plant form for several reasons. First of all it is a totally organic shape which I find interesting. I have placed this desert plant sculpture in the Northeastern quadrant of the United States, specifically Garrison, NY. The viewer may wonder why is a cactus growing on a farm in New York state. It gives me the opportunity to affect the viewer and alert him or her to the warming nature of climate change which can affect our gardens, nature as we know it, and weather conditions. It was also shown at the Green Door storefront window in 2013. I have built several cacti pieces in the last few years. I have exhibited them at the Kingston, NY, Sculpture Biennial, Saunders Farm Collaborative Concepts sculpture park, Garrison, NY, and a very large piece was exhibited as part of a solo show in 2012 at the Catskill Art Society & Art Center in Livingston Manor, NY.

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Jim Thomson (Field IV)


Honker Swan
Vinyl and plastic
5.8' x 5'

Being born in a duck yard does not matter, if only you are hatched from a swan’s egg.

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Alex Uribe (Field III)


Red Cap
Brick, clay tile, bamboo and stone

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Chuck von Schmidt (Field III)


Wear R U Gong Les Cargo?
Steel
6’ x 8’ x 2.5’

This terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks's approximation is a memorial to my first NY pet, “Snailie,” whom I found at an Italian Fish Market on Bleeker Street back in ’69. A real party animal, he would keep me up at nights as he noisily chomped on lettuce. We were pals when Armstrong first set foot on the moon.

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Eva Whorley (Field IV)


Combo #9
Mixed media
Dimensions variable

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Ellen Wilkinson (Field II)


Two Related Objects, blue and orange
Painted Plywood
4.5’ x 6’ 10” x 18”

This piece is about geometry and perception. The two objects have the same dimension in depth and height but are different shapes. The orange triangle is truncated so that all three sides are of equal length. Orange and blue are complementary colors, but the orange object reflects light much more powerfully than the blue. The blue shape disappears in certain light. The blue and orange shapes are not touching, but from several viewpoints they appear to be. The viewing experience changes as the sunlight and clouds animate the objects from above.

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Dieter Kuhn and Max Yawney (Field III)
(collaboration)


Bus Stop/(spinning) Buffalo Wings
Paint on wood with potters wheel
12’ x 8’ x 12’

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Collaborative Concepts
College Program for Advanced Environmental Art

Collaborative Concepts College Program for Advanced Environmental Art was created in 2007 to provide qualified college students the experience of creating and presenting art with professional artists of the annual Farm Project. As an educational component the selected artists are mentored, from the process of conceiving a proposal, through the installation of a final work of art. Besides technical assistance, each student receives a stipend.

This year Storm King School, a private high school, created a sculpture through this program with art teacher John Carruthers.

Previous recipients were Florencia Escudero, George Heintz, Victoria Duffee, Christine Dempsey, and Mikyung Mikki Kim. These artists are encouraged to be part of our ongoing exhibitions.

 

Performance artists

 

Lorene Bouboushian

Dwell and Ingest/Digest

Lorene Bouboushian, Paige Fredlund, and Kaia Gilje have worked as a loose collective since 2012. Their work is rooted in somatic exploration, which they pursue through perceptual shifts of the rebellious moving body and sounding voice. Their experience at the farm enabled both depth and playfulness to emerge in performance in a wholly new way.

Bouboushian
Bouboushian

decomposer

one song many centers

decomposer explores the interaction of sight and sound in space. We are collaborative, responsive, and elastic. decomposer is Matt Frieburghaus, Thomas Huber, and Laura Kaufman.
For the 2014 Saunders Farm performance, a group of players followed a set of basic instructions within the landscape as they improvised with each other, sculptures, and the farm. many songs one center made a spatial pairing with the 2013 decomposer performance at Saunders Farm, many centers one song.

decomposer
decomposer

Robert Ladislas Derr

Shoveling

In Shoveling, I launch from the saying that one man’s trash is another man’s treasure, and so it goes with excrement. Since early times, excrement has been recognized as a fertilizer for the land and a natural combustive material for heat. It has even been incorporated into many art pieces. While having incredible biological advantages, excrement is instinctively avoided across nature. I am using this dubious material as the subject of my making. In this decidedly subjective field, like the precarious existence of excrement, it is impossible to predict which art will be thought of as thin, or which will be heralded as thick. On Saunders Farm, for five hours, I shoveled the cattle’s excrement into the word thin, where it will remain, decompose, and fertilize the word into the grass. As I perform, I ask the the Farm visitors, “Is it thick or thin?” The following growing season, thin will grow thickly in the pasture, after which time, the video and photographs of the performance will live on, and may even, one day, be considered a thick treasure.

Robert Ladislas Derr

Andrea Elam

Blue/Grass

As a dance artist, I seek to integrate dance performance into community settings in such a way that the environment becomes as much a part of the dance as the music and choreography. My dance on the farm was a direct response to the setting, the weather and terrain on that particular day, the presence of my observers and my own physical and emotional state.

Robert Ladislas Derr

Marcy B. Freedman

Do You Remember Winter?

An interactive performance

Last winter was particularly harsh in our region, with lots and lots of snow and many days and nights of freezing temperatures. Surely, these extreme weather conditions mark the winter of 2013-14 as a truly unpleasant and unforgettable season. Maybe yes, maybe no! Marcy B. Freedman’s interactive performance proved that people are different – with respect to powers of recall and opinions about the weather! On a beautiful summer day, the artist – incongruously dressed in winter attire – wandered around the farm, questioning visitors about our most recent winter. She discovered a whole range of responses, from folks who had no special memories to those who immediately started to rant and rave about the horrors they had experienced. To her great surprise, she also encountered a few hardy souls who loved the challenges and the beauty of piles and piles of snow. This performance represents Freedman’s ongoing attempt to provide the world with an antidote to the ubiquitous forms of “virtual” interaction, such as email, texting, and social networking. As such, Freedman’s work engages real people in real time and real space for real interpersonal communication.

Bouboushian
Bouboushian

TEAM Keeney-McNally

Play-by-Play

The performance-based and sculptural work of Matthew Keeney and Erin McNally meet at the intersection of farce and futility. In their inaugural collaboration, Play-by-Play, these artists take their common interest in media as material to explore the performative nature of spectator events. Using the jargon of competitive sports, Matthew Keeney & Erin McNally adopt the role of television announcers, providing play-by-play analysis of the 2014 Farm Project. Their absurd commentary uses parody to highlight the parallels between professional artists and athletes as they confront adversity. The thrill of victory and the agony of defeat drive these two groups as they relentlessly pursue their elusive goals.

TEAM Keeney-McNally

Lisa Levy

Psychotherayp LIVE! with Dr. Lisa

I have an exaggerated need to emotionally connect with people in a direct way, which is what drives my work. I use my work to try to make emotional though platonic connections, even with people I meet casually, which is ridiculous, but I love it. I use the results of these endeavors to help myself and other people connect and feel strength in vulnerability.

Levy
Levy

Nathaniel Sullivan

A Modest Proposal: How to Explain Finance to a Cow

I am an artist that makes satirical performances about financial logic, and the mythologies of capitalism. I have led a seminar on desire from the back of a limousine, told the history of the financial crisis through the love letters of JP Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon, and wandered through Zuccotti park during the occupy protests looking for friends while wearing a $1500 suit and a Goldman Sachs ID card. I am Inspired by satirical texts such as Johnathan Swift’s “A Modest Proposal,” which proposed that poor Irish folks should eat their children to solve hunger and poverty. I believe that satire needs a measure of earnestness to be effective. When called upon, I can be quite convincing. In the case of my “Modest Proposal,” I used cows as a subject to skewer some of capitalism’s most glaring contradictions. A terrible logic is the undercurrent of late capitalism; through financial abstraction, the autonomy of all subjects (human included) is nullified. Is this the only way out from debt?

Sullivan
 

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Music at the Opening Reception

Yasgur

Yasgur

 

Bert Rehtschaffer Trio

Bert Rehtschaffer Trio
(photo on right by John Haines)

 

Judith band

The Judith Tulloch Band

 

Leah Nikolaya/Siegel

Leah Nikolaya/Siegel

 

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Arts in the Highlands

Dance: Dance Entropy: Color & Mystery

Dance: Dance Entropy: Color & Mystery

Directed by Valerie Green

Dance Entropy performs a powerful collection of short works ranging the spectrum of uplifting, mysterious, beautiful, and humorous. These colorful vibrant dances are sure to get the audience thinking, feeling, laughing, and moving!
“Articulate, fearless, intelligent dancing”- VILLAGE VOICE


Howl: A Shaggy Wolf’s Tale (Tail)

Howl: A Shaggy Wolf’s Tale (Tail)

Written by Thomas Kramer
Directed by Mara Mills

Howl is an examination of the flexibility of truth as seen through classic stories that we have known since our childhood. In the end, we realize things are not always what they seem.
What is life like through the eyes of the Big, Bad Wolf? Find out with this mixture of familiar fairy tales turned topsy-turvy.

Cast: George Crooms, Nellie O’Brien, Donna Barkman, Louise Kaminer, David Sevensky, Jean Basilett, Steel drum–Jeremy Gratt


Opera: Career Bridges

Opera: Career Bridges

Directed by David S. Bender

Many extraordinarily gifted young operatic singers complete their formal training but are not yet fully prepared for a career. Lack of good training in many areas, lack of funds for further study, limited performance opportunities, and lack of guidance have stymied many of these extremely qualified singers in the pursuit of their careers, thus depriving us all of their potential greatness.
We are committed to providing the unique level of tangible and practical support that will enable our young singers the opportunity to fulfill their potential and achieve the greatness that will enhance all our lives.


www.careerbridges.org


Opera: Career Bridges  

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Collaborative Concepts
is a not-for-profit arts organization based on the idea that professional artists
working together can achieve artful accomplishments and provide the community with exceptional cultural
experiences. Since its founding in 1999, Collaborative Concepts has curated more than 40 exhibitions in galleries
and outdoor settings in the Hudson Valley.
For its ninth season, Collaborative Concepts at Saunders Farm invited local, national, and international artists to
place sculptures throughout 100 acres of a working historic farm in Garrison, NY. Located across the Hudson River
from West Point, the rolling hills and wooded glens of Saunders Farm culminate in panoramic views of the Hudson
Highlands. Black Angus cattle can be seen grazing peacefully in stone-walled pastures. Approximately 50 site specific
artworks were chosen to complement the farm’s open spaces and spectacular vistas.
A curated performance art component has become an integral part of our Opening Reception, interacting with the
sculptures, viewers, and the setting. Opera, dance, and theatre performances for Arts in the Highlands at the
Mid-Run Reception complete our growing roster of artists and art forms presented at Saunders Farm.
All the sculpture installations are temporary, and many works are for sale. Please inquire through our website, by
phone, or email.


Committee for the Farm Project 2014
Elizabeth Barksdale
Jo-Ann Brody
Jodi Carlson
Sarah Haviland
Dell Jones
Thom Joyce
Jim Lloyd
Michael Anthony Natiello
Herman Roggeman
Marcy B. Freedman--Performance
Thom Joyce--Music

Exhibition Calendar
Opening reception: August 30, 2-6pm
with music and performance art

Mid Run Reception: September 27, 2-6pm
Arts in the Highlands
Dance: Dance Entropy
            Directed by Valerie Green
Theatre: Howl
            Directed by Thomas Kramer and Mara Mills
Opera: Career Bridges
            Directed by David S. Bender

With special thanks—
Sandy and Shelley (hosts and support)
Jonathan Galente and Mary Beth Minton
Joyce Picone, Executive Director, Putnam Arts Council

Thanks to the following for their generous
donations of time, talent, and wisdom:
Jo-Ann Brody (administration, brochure, catalog design)
Jodi Carlson (website, facebook)
Sarah Haviland (copy editing)
Cathrin Hoskinson (price list, walking tour map)
Dell Jones (all things)
Thom Joyce (sound engineer)
Herman Roggeman (artists’ angel)
Nicole Shea, Eisenhower Leadership Center
Robert Van Winkle (crane and tractor)
Max Yawney and individual artists (photography)
The siting committee
The engineering committee
The reception volunteers

Collaborative Concepts at Saunders Farm is made possible, in part, by the New York State Council on the Arts (www.nysca.org) with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the NY State Legislature. In Putnam County this grant program is managed and monitored by the Putnam Arts Council (www.putnamartscouncil.com), Mahopac, NY. Additonal funding comes from the Putnam Arts Fund (PAF), which is supported with public funds from Putnam County. The exhibition and events are also made possible with the generous funding of the Anne Anastasi Charitable Foundation and the generosity of our donors.

Collaborative Concepts
P O Box 76
Garrison NY
1.845.528.1797
www.collaborativeconcepts.org

 

 

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