Collaborative Concepts
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2012

 

Anna Adler


Power Suits
mixed media
Drawing inspiration from the vast expanse of beautiful Saunders Farm, as well as working with the idea of temporary inhabitance of this landscape,
Power Suits creates a clothesline spanning approximately 75 ft. It contains both real and fantastical garments and objects, created from fabric, plastic sheeting, and found objects, suspended off of the ground. The contents of the clothesline contain evidence of wear and references the potential characters that once used them.
The clothesline activates the landscape, allowing the viewer to create a fictional narrative about the mysterious inhabitants that have hung their “laundry” out to dry.
The implication of domesticity, home, and history contributes to the energy and story of these fictional relics

 

 

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John Allen


rock, paper, scissors
commercial paper toweling
68’ long
Stone wall “intervention

 

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Ben Altman




Dreamsofa4
30” x 100” x 54”
found stone from Saunders farm, quarried paving stones, Hudson River driftwood, wooden sign board
DreamSofa4 is part of an ongoing series of interactive pieces. Each sofa is built in a place where one might wish to sit and enjoy a view. Built mostly from materials found near the site, the sofas demonstrate that comfort depends on context. They are also an opportunity to share ideas and experiences.
Visitors are invited to use and/or change the piece, to photograph or write
about their uses, changes, and experiences, and to send photos and writings for
inclusion in a blog (http://benaltman.net/dreamsofa).
After a period, each
sofa is dismantled
– either by the artist
or by the elements.

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Cathy Bakker


Bag the Bags
recycled plastic bags (grocery, shopping,
produce, dry cleaner bags, etc.)
A giant re-usable plastic bag hangs from a  tree at the top level of the farm.  The giant bag is made of
recycled plastic bags, sewn together in squares, which reveal facts such as: 14 plastic bags contain enough petroleum to drive a car one mile etc.  In big letters it reads... Plastic Blows.

 

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Elizabeth Mansour Barksdale


Sculpture Bars
steel
8’ x 30’ x 30’
I was inspired to create Sculpture Bars while watching my children climb on monkey bars. I remembered doing so myself as a child, reminiscing about swinging on uneven parallel bars in gymnastics, imagining the
parallel bars themselves having the fun. I could see them in my mind twirling around, twisting and moving.
As an artist, I enjoy the physical aspects of sculpture, chosing small enough rod so I could bend the arches by hand, feeling the metal yield and its strength holding the shapes once the pressure was released, its strength complementing my own. In my continuing desire to walk around inside of my sculptures, and to share that joy with others, I arched the rods overhead, creating multiple arches as the rods twist throughout the piece. I utilized a torch to create the detailed areas. The spirals were inspired by watching plants grow, especially the twining tendrils of viney plants like peas as they grasp for larger stalks to grow onto. The angles, squares, triangles, and zig-zags made me think of forked branches and broken stalks. They contrasted nicely with the curves. I welded these detailed rods in between the parallel rods so they could appear to play there.
As you look at my sculpture, remember, an artist is inside her work; I hope will you join me and walk through my Sculpture Bars

 

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John Belardo




Ethic
steel, wood
130” x 72” x 60”
I am exploring how the figure can retain integrity and vitality within a heavy and onerous conceptual structure. I am interested in the way theory affects perception and how abstraction emerges from objectivity; this idea is rooted in science and inspired by nature, in which tension and conflict are creative. In my work a unique form emerges within the composite of two objective forms. In this case it is the marriage of the geodesic sphere with the forms of a human eye

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Michael Bertelli

Snubby
cold-cast marble
“At first he’s cuddly, deeper inspection reveals a heavy thinker.” This is Snubby, compared favorably by the artist to Rodin’s The Thinker.
The original is in carved marble plus two castings are icold cast.
Added to this ensemble are The Sage, a stoic wise teacher
holding the book of ………. , carved from a marble block; also, Billy Bud, a seaman whose unique character was created by
Herman Melville in a novella of the same name.
Mike Bertelli has been creating sculpture for over 40 years. His major works and career highlights can be viewed at
www.mikebertelli.com.

 

 

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Lea Bolotins


For the Birds
burlap, astro turf, vines, fabric, webbing, suet
three pieces

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David Boyajian


Lift
steel
14’ x 10’
Lift is a kinetic sculpture fabricated from steel. The linear sculpture with
silhouettes of kiting birds rocks and spins in the wind. The sculpture was inspired after a series of etchings, titled one world one piece, where the bird images are entangled in series of concentric circles elevated high above the earth—vying for balance, placement, and position in a place of limited movement and stability.

 

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Richard Brachman

Richard Brachman
Give Us Bread
(Italian bread, bagel)
fiberglass, resin, steel
8’ x 6’
The title references a line by John Graham during a May Day parade held in New York City in the early 1930s. The event is described in the Willem de Kooning biography by Mark Stevens and Annalyn Swan. I found it to be apropos of our times, when one in five of the U.S. population lives in poverty and one in six is hungry. The sculpture is a commentary on our current world economic stagnation and the catastrophic effect that the looting of the world financial system by Wall Street has had on so many families, the poor, and the young.
The sculpture is composed of two
pieces of bread, a pumpernickel bagel
and a loaf of Italian bread. They are
built oversized to call attention to the
magnitude of the problem of poverty
and hunger. Unfortunately they are
not edible

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Jo-Ann Brody



Fertility, Fecundity, Farm (13 pieces)
colored cement, foam, rebar
Catkins, cocoons, balanced on a thin stalk waving in the wind. Egyptian fertility goddesses, bird women, pure symbols abstracted but holding the full story of femininity within themselves. These were my inspiration. My sincerest critics—the cows—enjoy them, rubbing up against them,
visiting them over and over again, bending the stalks, collaborating with me as they edit the work.

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Robert Brush

A fisherman always sees another fisherman from afar tree stump, black stain
This piece deals with the positive space. What is seen as a rotting tree stump, when painted black, brings awareness of the past, present,
connectedness, and isolation. This piece will be part of a series shown not only as sculpture, but also as photographs.

 

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Susan Buroker



In the fields
aluminum, sepele mahogany
8’ x 5’ x 4’
In the Fields sculpture is a dedication to the introduction of
machine farming and the reminiscence of hand farming.

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J.M Carnright/Ilse Schreiber-Noll


mixed media on aluminum with poetry excerpts by Walt Whitman
Searching for a New Planet is the solution to Only History Remains, an ongoing project I started in the 1990’s, a visual documentation of history depicting the destruction of our planet by war, pollution, and natural disasters, which I have expressed in books, mixed media and prints.
Seen through the eyes of children, Searching for a New Planet is an
allegory, a narrative of the flight of the children to bring awareness to the issues threatening humanity. The project consists of Artist Books, paintings, and installations that show the migration of the children who came from around the world to find a planet that offers what we have taken away from them: The promise of a secure and better future.

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Jodi Carlson

Orange Drop
aluminum
5’ x 5’ x 10’
Orange Drop is a tall aluminum sculpture born from whimsical musings
on line, form, and depth. A favorite way to begin a sculpture is to take
the castoffs of other sculptures and ask, “What would happen if…?”
Here, I wondered how I’d handle the space created by a large tripod-type
base. I didn’t want to make a sculpture base (like a tall box that acts as
a platform for a piece of art you might see in a museum), but to make a
sculpture that was both a base and a presentation platform for another
sculpture.
All of the material for this sculpture was repurposed, made from metal
pieces that didn’t make the cut in previous sculptures. Many of my
sculptures in the past few years have been quite solid, so I purposefully
created a very “unsolid” work. I used tubes and rods to dart through
space and curve up to a point so that I could hang another sculpture up
in the air.
Recently I found an artisan willing to teach me about better weather-tight
finishes. I celebrated this knowledge by making the sculpture hanging
from the top a bright orange, painted in a two-part epoxy that is superior
to my previous finishes. The color reflects the form, reminiscent of a flame.

 

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Diana Carulli


attachment To Attachment
woven hemp, weed wacker plastic, almaloy wire,
steel with rust patina
2 structures 11’ x 6’ x variable
The work attachment To Attachment allows for disparate elements to be joined in one work. The woven attachment connects to Attachment’s two steel structures, literally.

 

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Steve Ceraso



Buoys Totem 1
welded steel and found objects
11’ x 3.5’ x 3’
I am interested in what discarded materials say about our society. I work with repurposed materials, objects found in nature, or industrial fragments. I prefer working with materials and objects that contain a specific kind of history. In my search for the components of my work, the result is determined by my immediate surroundings. I live near the water, specifically near the Great South Bay on Long Island. This body of water was once a vital part of the South Shore, thriving with life. Today the ecological stresses on the bay make it a shadow of what it once was. In my work I often depict a dystopian future based on the events that seem to unfold around me. I accept that my vision can be perceived as not overly optimistic, however it isn’t my goal to create a false sense of reality. I would rather indicate a sense of awareness through my work.    

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Joe Chirchillo



Cat Structure
plywood, pine
My intent when I made this sculpture was to combine architectural and natural forms to create a hybrid object, building the sculpture so that the elements of each are unmistakable yet stand on their own as well. This piece shows the deep connections between construction and the
morphology of living creatures.

The cat form was inspired by Egyptian sculpture and my belief in the power of three dimensional objects in the landscape.
Human beings have evolved to interact both physically and emotionally to the world around us. I am working to re-open this part of the viewer’s mind in this time when so much of our information comes from images viewed on screens.

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Ada Pilar Cruz
Untitled installation

 

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Auggie Della Vecchia/Susan Zoon


Chrysalis
wood, metal, maché
Chrysalis contains five connected parts as follows. A skeleton within a cage is connected to four outer pieces representing four winds. Within the structure of each of the four winds will be a circular mandala.
All five pieces are suspended so both visitors and cows are able to pass below the sculpture.

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Victoria Duffee


Pyramid of Plastic Flowers
vinyl, wood, soil, plastic flowers

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Florencia Escudero/George Heinz


Don’t me there that’s my nono square
7’ x 7’ x 3 1/2’
Skidmarks
wood, textile
12’ x 8’ x 4’
We want to work with what is there already and use different methods to make a theatrical way of seeing.

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Denis Folz / Axel Folz



Olympics 2012 on Saunders Farm
steel, wood
13’ x 9’

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Ruth Hardinger




Continuous Draw #6 - Capture
rope, concrete
My 6th consecutive installation at Saunders Farm continues the pursuit of a tension structure in which each component impacts the whole construct.  #6 - Capture frames and encases the landscape.  Hefty concrete bundles -- cast in milk cartons or packing boxes and suspended along the rope -- everyday objects positioned like fetishes, are associated with sustenance and use, yet are commonly discarded.  The shell is no longer there, the contents are fossilized. The draw continues

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Cathrin Hoskinson


Forest Spirit
mirrored plexiglas
4 1/2” x 16”, 9 1/2” x 36”, 6 1/2” x 19”
After an afternoon drawing on site, I found myself using the branching, pulsing movement of the tree itself to suggest a similar inner life. This linear form is like a fire within, and perhaps mirrors an inner spirit of the viewer. The blue connects with the sky, to which the tree is yearning.
In putting together a poetic image, I like to work with forms which resemble many things at once - a leaf, a wound, a fire, a hand. Here I see that I’m using a form which brings to mind Thai temple decoration, and the Pentecost images of my Catholic upbringing. At Saunders Farm, I have used blue mirrors before, and I love the way they catch the light and bring in the surrounding landscape.

 

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Elena Kalman

Injured Tree
broken tree and spray paint
Nature is violent in its own ways: a perfectly natural storm can be totally devastating. We all also commit violent acts toward nature.
Does the tree feel pain when it is cut down or torn out of the ground by the hurricane wind? Every child asks these questions, but the adults forget about them.
After Hurricane Irene tore and hurled a large oak tree onto my house, causing the roof to crash into my living room, I thought about acts of violence in Nature and toward Nature.
In my recent work I use Nature
as my co-creator and just add
some small elements to what
is already there. My work is
about “re-styling” or “re-
decoration” efforts. I blend my
touches with what is already
there and pursue seamless
unity with surroundings. I want
my work to be subtle and
magical. The viewer should stumble upon it, and be surprised when he notices something not quite right. I call my pieces “surprises.”

 

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Dana Kenn



Yarn Bomber
steel, plastic, mirror aluminum, yarn
people profiles reflect
surroundings...
color stands out and helps define the shapes...
Cow friendly...weather friendly...wind friendly...fun...
I have a growing interest in guerilla art, urban knitting, yarn storming and yarn bombing...

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Insun Kim




Heritage 2
stainless steel nails
48” x 48” x 132”
Nails are very important tools in terms of structure and stability. One nail by itself, however, cannot hold too much together. Much of the time it is necessary for multiples to be used in unison. Each nail represents a
person in my work. I use stainless steel nails for the clean and pure
appearance. When each nail is welded to the ones next to it, it will
visually have a bond specific to that set of nails. Every bond or weld is different, which comes to represent the individual relationships between people on a grand scale. Each nail used differs in size from the ones next to it, below it, and above it in a way to simulate the variety found in nature and society. In this event when we take a step back we no longer see each individual nail, but one tree, one tree that encompasses thousands of smaller pieces which each have their own bonds and relationships and ultimately play a much larger role maintaining stability and structure through their strength.

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Kaiya Karpijaakka

Arrangement Box
10’ x 3’ x 2’
rust patinaed steel

Moss Embedded Table
10’ x 3’ x 30 “
rust patinaed steel, growing moss

 

 

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Bernard Klevickas



Untitled (waveforms)
hydraulically formed aluminum
3’ x 12’ x 12’

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Abby Lloyd



Big Girl
fabric, lace
15’ x 18’ (underwear), 15’ x 20’ (bra)
The concept for my piece is a that giant (an actual giant) has a wild night and accidentally drops her belongings in the farm. The items include a gigantic pair of underwear and a bra draping from a tree.

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Jim Lloyd


Large Ferrosynthetic Domestic Animal
dimensions variable
Ferrosynthesis is a product of natural selection and intelligent design. From the creation of the atoms at the beginning of our time to this site on the hill, there is a traceable product of the physics of evolution and the evolution of physics. But that’s another story. The cows in the field and the hill and the grass suggested self-emulation into a large domestic animal in a barn. The cows have been there to visit. They left a gift

 

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Alex Manikas/Steve Randall *


Views One, Two, Three
photograph, wood
6” x 12” x 48” each
Taking pictures to validate an experience, especially to somehow “prove” that an occasion happened for the eventual upload to the internet, instead of actually enjoying the moment, completely defeats the purpose of the moment. While the evolution of gadgets and digital tools has
allowed artists to be more creative, sometimes the novelty of technology is used to validate reality, to create a sort of hyper world in which the
number of pixels matter more than the smell of the air and the feel of the sun baking your skin.

 

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John Martin


Red on White and Blue #2
bamboo, paint, threaded rod, vinyl tubing
Red on White and Blue #2 is the second in a series of seven red poles meant to evoke the stripes in our flag.
The piece is displayed about six feet off the ground to allow for the white and blue to be provided by the sky.
The color red and the number seven carry a lot of emotional symbolism, which is an important part of this piece.
Much like the first, this piece continues to represent pride and anger at how our country seems to have veered so far off
course. There are also expressions of disappointment with the orientation of the flag hanging rather than flying and
renewed hope in the future through the formation being dimensionally true to the red stripes in our flag.

 

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Dave McNeil


Spring
stainless steel
60“ x 48“
This sculpture was inspired by the shape of plants called fiddle- heads that grow in early spring. As they grow, they unfurl themselves as they rise.
The sculpture is about life and renewal. I use stainless steel in many of my sculptures, not only for its
durability but for its contrast to the natural world. I like to base my sculptures on forms that can be found in nature.
This provides me with an unlimited source of creativity. Nature has always proven to be the best teacher.

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Michael Anthony Natiello
Untitled

 

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David Provan



Theory of the Sacred IV
powder-coated welded steel
126”x 42”x 24”
Theory of the Sacred IV is made of two contrasting sets of elements: straight, vertical bars at the sculpture’s four corners (representing the “rational”) and curved bars randomly placed between them (the
“chaotic”). The resulting image is one of twisting, swirling energy
restrained within a four-cornered container. This interaction of
elements echoes the Yin-Yang concept of Chinese Taoists and how seeming-opposites can collaborate to produce an integrated whole
– i.e., without the curved bars, the straight bars cannot stand and
vice versa.

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Sheilah Rechtschaffer


Sugar Maple Trees and Global Warming
mixed media
In March, my husband and I went to the Hudson Highlands Nature
Museum in Cornwall, NY. With our 5-year-old granddaughter, we learned about Sugar Maple trees and the diminishing supply of sap this year because of the mild winter.
Modern harvesting developed a system of plastic tubes running through the trees to a central collector. But the pails with spigots are there as a reminder of the traditional method—a delightful visual memory. Small producers have invested in the modern method.
In 2012 sap quantities were greatly reduced. Less is
predicted in 2013, driving the price higher.
I present this installation as a plea. Only awareness and
action can prevent the constant assaults on nature brought
by global warming.
No sap, no syrup!

 

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Mario Rusich


Shelter (ca. 2062)
branches, vines, leaves, birch sticks, field grass
7’ x 3 1/2’ x 10’
My intention in utilizing local vegetation for the construction of the
installation Shelter, (ca. 2062,) at Saunders Farm had to do with the
necessity to express and convey the view that we shall have to use any and all materials in our surroundings to enable us to survive in the future, and “shelter” ourselves.
The work concerns the dire moment in human history that we find ourselves in here on earth. After ignoring the conditions brought on by global warming and the continuous denial of climate change, we will be forced
to deal with disastrous
scenarios brought about
by natural forces beyond
our control!

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Herman Roggeman


Small Animal Condos
steel and mesh
10’ tall
Boxed living quarters for small animals: squirrels,
chipmunks, mice, birds, even snakes. Each box has one open side for easy entrance.

 

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Peter Schlemowitz



ZigZagZodiac
plywood, masonite, steel angle
16’ x 9’ x 10’
ZigZagZodiac is based on one of a series of modular sculptures  that are constructed by connecting individual shapes together with connectors that can be fastened manually without mechanical hardware. The shapes in ZigZagZodiac are based on wrapping line segments, straight or curved, around a center, while increasing the segment lengths in an arithmetic progression.

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Fred Schlitzer


Sandy’s Farm
sheets of copper riveted together
I created my piece to capture the undulating feel of the farm as you walk from one field to the next.

 

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Marcia Spivak



Big Red
steel
84” x  24” x 94”
Big Red is a slight departure from most of my metal equine sculptures. He embodies a certain joy of renewal and recreation.  The horse is
fabricated from discarded wheel barrels, old tool parts, and abandoned sheets of steel. These abandoned pieces come together to enjoy a new and yet familiar presence on the farm.

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Kevin Stapp


Hammock
plastic bags
I restaged the hammock idea in the same spot as my rope hammock from 2008 show but this time the hammock uses ropes made from grocery bags.
It is a play on memory.

 

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Hideki Takahashi


Forest
acrylic on 3’ tall denim panels
Several denim rings are stacked on each other to create a huge woods painting, all stretched arround trees.
This installation allows people to see the space between, inside, and outside the trees. People and cows or
horses can barely fit inside the space.

 

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Naomi Teppich

Cactus Cocoon
steel, colored cement, enamel
10’ x 7’ x 5’
Cactus Cocoon is an imaginary new form of plant that is developing in the world as a result of the global warming of our planet. We look forward to the cocoons developing in the spring. The question is.. will the butterfly and moth cocoons turn into hot weather cacti and desert plants? Is this the kind of bio-diversity that we have come to expect?
My sculpture is built with four sections of welded rebar and coated with layers of colored cement. The cactus cocoon hybrid is the combination of a cactus and cocoon shape, with outlines of cactus leaves. At the top, the plant bursts forth with bright red blooms.

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Jim Thomson



Blue Dragonfly
mixed media
10’ tall

 

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Alex Uribe

Untitled
bricks, reed

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Robert Van Winkle


Untitled
high plasma cut stainless steel sculpture
10’ tall

 

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Chuck Von Schmidt



Orpheus
fiberglass, automotive paint
Continuing on the “Don’t Look Back” theme, I offer an Yves Klein blue Orpheus standing in a tree. He faces West, so he is always looking to the future.  His staff is adorned with small reflective surfaces facing East, “aimed” such that at a certain time, all of the reflections line up to form an image of a skull on the ground behind him.

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Eva Whorley


Sentinel
foam over wood and wire armature
4’ x 5’ x 2’
Sentinnel is a herding canine, perfect for people to sit on. He stands guard over the pasture and perhaps roams from time to time.

 

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Ellen Wilkinson




Yellow Ascending
wood, paint
38” x 59” x 19.5” each
The eight yellow triangles create an optical experience - in time. They
appear to shift as visitors approach them by either ascending or
descending the field.
The project marries geometry with organic form. The shapes emphasize a man-made intervention in the landscape while the repetitive yellow color protruding from the ground recalls daffodils, sunflowers and sunbeams. The work interacts with nature as the movement of the sun each day highlights the different
sides of the triangles, and
the grass grows
underneath.

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Max Yawney


Wing Man Spinning / Color Field
wood, plastic mesh, acrylic, pottery wheel

 

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Yurt City, Sheila Ross and Laura Ten Eyck


Cow Semaphore
fabric, thread, flags, rope, wood, paint
Sheila Ross and Laura Ten Eyck, founders and co-collaborators of Yurt City, have created Cow Semaphore, a special flag and land marker for the cows of Saunders Farm. Hidden in the hybrid flag-pole and shutter-semaphore inspired structure is a secret message. For more information on Cow Semaphore and other Yurt City projects, including a flag project on the Jersey Shore in Long Branch, NJ, see www.yurtcity.blogspot.com

 

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Susan Zoon

 

 

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PERFORMANCE

 

Marcy B Freedman




When Farm Animals Sing
Marcy B. Freedman presents a one-on-one, face-to-face
interactive performance piece called When Farm Animals Sing. The artist approacheds visitors and explains her interest in the sounds made by farm animals. She then invites people to use her megaphone or their own lung-power to project some loud “moo’s” or “bahs” into the world. Some participants may agree to be video-taped in the act of “singing.” Others may be content to create an ephemeral animal song. The artist enjoys all of the sounds that result from her project!

 

 

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