Collaborative Concepts
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2009

Artist in Alphabetical order

Anna Adler v-39
“Tired” mixed media

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David Alban iii-19

"Mandible Fragment"
wood with steel

I choose wood as a material and process because of the massive physicality it affords me. My recent work has centered on teeth and mandibles, coming from some industrial-strength dental work I endure. Teeth are very prominent in all of the animal kingdom. They function as tools and weapons. Much attention is paid to them visually. Our culture assigns an utmost importance to their image. Likewise, the mandible is a very prominent feature. It is the first bone to develop in utero. These are self-portraits. I want them to be large enough to remove you from the experience we all have in front of the mirror of picking, brushing, and flossing. I patterned them off my own without having a bitewing done. When fabricating I am reminded of the studies I have done in the anatomy lab and the discovery an archeologist must feel in the field.

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John Allen Iv-33
"Untitled"
mixed media

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Emil Alzamora iii-26
"Bovine Rev!"
banner/ mixed media

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Beth Bailis iv-28
“House of Cards” Acrylic on wood

“Bailis’ work often breaks the limits of traditional square canvas and two-dimensional space, with objects reaching out and off in every direction. In her engagement of three-dimensional space, Ms. Bailis is as much a sculptor as a painter and collage artist.Her rescue of ‘throw away’ objects is a reminder that everything has aesthetic potential.”- Eileen McTiernan, Gallery Director of Mount Beacon Fine Art, Beacon, NY.

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Lisa Breznak iv-31
“Overhead” Bamboo, metal, cement, paint

While spending so much time at the Farm last summer, I was taken with the number and variety of birds occupying the space. Sometimes lyrical as they hung in mid air, sometimes raucous as they'd defend their territory, they were always entertaining and soothing to watch as they moved effortlessly through the sky. Time stood still. My attention focused, my mind joined them and then would take off on its own. Other times, walking the fields, I would catch glimpses and flashes of movement overhead that expanded my widening awareness of the space and then of nature around me.

This piece is a thank you to the avian world for their inspiration of soaring possibilities without humanly perceived bounds.

Like most of my works, these bird forms are gilded to catch light and glimmer as they and the sun move. They sway in the wind. Actual movement implies flight.

This piece is designed to make use of the open space above and the gentle rise and falls of the landscape to accentuate height and the dark backdrop of the woods behind to set off the moving golden flashes representing bird-ness and nature's energy.

 

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Jo-Ann Brody v-36
Two Women Dancing
Construction materials, pvc pipe & foam

Dancers in the field, two women create a humorous installation. A joyous and exuberant celebration of life, art, and the farm-site as I revisit it for the forth year.

An experiment with letting go—using a new, untried, and untested material—having no idea how it will work, age, stand up to cows, etc. My standard forms change with this new media. The coral-like build ups, the pearly color that will change and age, the lack of detail, all truth to this new goo. The challenge of working in new ways always informs my ar

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Robert Brush i-2
CAUTION ARTWORK AHEAD
VMS sign
Variable-message signs are typically used to alter traffic
patterns near work zones and for traffic management
and information for temporary changes in normal traffic
patterns. However, my concept is to warn of Artwork. This
presents the idea that Art provokes and may change the
direction of the viewer’s thinking.

 

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Jodi Carlson ii-12
"MOO"
aluminum and steel,
8' wide x 4' deep x 11'5" high.

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Ursula Clark vii-53
Question Mark Butterfly
hay, chickenwire, and sticks

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Ada Pilar Cruz v-35
"Weaving Lesson"

 

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Doc Dochterman ii-9
“Retro Metropolis”

Recycled metal

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Augustine Della Vecchia + Pamela Stockamore ii-14

"Breaktime"
metal with picnic table
working sundial

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Habitat for Artists (Simon Draper/Michael Anthony Natiello) i-1
“Saunders Farm Habitat for Artists”

Mixed media

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Florencia Escudero vi-51 “Hands” metal

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Tom Faulkner vi-48
Water Fall

A site-specific installation by

Website: thomasdfaulkner.com

WATER FALL is sited on an irregularly shaped pond 75’ wide and 155’ long. It is the watering hole for herds of Black

Angus cattle and horses and a breeding environment for frogs. Within this pond an inner pond was created by floating 2” by 2” eye-bolt-and-screw-connected spindles, anchored to the pond bottom to prevent movement. This wooden inner “shoreline” was used to contain nearly 1500 16-ounce plastic bottles that were filled with dyed water to mirror fall colors. All of the bottles were upended with an air pocket created and weighted with marble chips. When the seasons change from summer to fall, leaves that fall on the pond mirror the autumnal colors in the bottles.

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Marcy B. Freedman

The Tree Hugger--Performance
Tree Hugger
“For me, art is always about challenging myself and the viewers of my art to experience the world in new ways. In this particular case, I am forcing myself to make close contact with nature – an unusual circumstance for me. I have no idea how I will feel during each performance, and I cannot predict the cumulative effect of multiple performances. But I am anxious to do this experiment.”

The artist recognizes that there will be a variety of reactions to her performance.

“I am sure that many people with be completely baffled by my decision to stand and hug a tree. However, I am convinced that some people will become deeply engaged in my process, sharing my reverential experience, to a certain extent.

Marcy B. Freedman i-3

“Wedded to the Earth”
Mixed media
NFS
Wedded to the Earth: A Short Statement

Marcy B. Freedman will install a traditional wedding arbor for the Saunders’ Farm receptions. Her intention is to remind viewers that their visit to the farm is a special occasion. The arbor will mark the entrance to a special site, where the sanctity of nature is respected by the artists who have placed their art within the landscape. The reference to a wedding ceremony suggests the link – a marriage of sorts – between human beings and the natural environment. Additionally, the arbor will act as a frame to highlight the spectacular vista of the farm and the art beyond.

 

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Janet Goldner iv-29

"Bambara/Bamana"
Hanging cut steel gate

The WhY (Ntlomaw) series was inspired by my research in Mali. Burnt onto the steel panels, the ntloma/Y-stick form is an architectural pillar, in the form of a forked stick used as the support for traditional Malian adobe houses. They are often quite undulating in form but provide, none-the-less, the internal structure and support for traditional buildings. With them I reconstruct the shaded area where elders gather to discuss important events and concepts both current and past. The form becomes a metaphor for structure, strength and support. The use of text to define the image is reminiscent of Islamic use of text. The sentences and phrases comes from my writings about Malian and American culture.

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Filipe Gueverra vi-49

“Square”
steel

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Jason Hahne vi-50

White take-out cow shed

 

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Ruth Hardinger i-5

“Continuous Draw 3”

rope, cement

This installation is my third temporary sculpture at Saunders Farm made with rope and concrete blocks stretched across trees.

In this work, the draw starts on one branch about 30 feet above the ground and stretches across an expanse of about 60 feet to weave back and forth seven times. The top and bottom rope ends are weighted with my hand-made concrete blocks bound to yellow rope. This work is composed using several rope thicknesses knotted together so that the run of rope is about merging irregular and un-similar parts to make a connected whole.

The trees are anchors, the landscape is a visual ground and this work, as with all the Continuous Draws, contains a continuous tension of all elements.

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Sarah Haviland iii-27
"Phoenix"
Painted furniture, mesh, and mixed-media

A Phoenix rises at Saunders Farm from a whirl of fiery debris, resourceful and resilient. The image was inspired by the mythical bird reborn from ashes—as well as the end-of-season artists bonfire—and combines previous themes of anthropomorphic bird forms and household histories.

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Tom Holmes i-6
Title: Dancing Spinning, Weeping Burning

Media: Cedar base, burnt white pine, two Icis pigeon feathers.

I work in stone, metal, wood, light, ice, and water. I work seasonally icing in the winter, welding in the Summer and burning in the Spring and Fall. Wood was my first medium and one that is closest to my heart. My father was a woodworker and I honor him with my intuitive use of its many qualities. I have been burning sculptures and wall pieces for the last four seasons. My first burnt sculptures simply scavenged from the fire pit and mounted in wood boxes. The evolution has brought me to the full scale burning of large structures as this one is. The feathers represent the dance of the wind and the play of the light. The burnt timber, the pain of the collapse of our culture. Facing it head on, looking to the horizon we can imagine a better time when we might be whole again......... This juxtaposition of lightness and dark balances the subconscious so that it may survive.

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Cathrin Hoskinson v-46

“Alternate Reality”

mirrored Plexiglas

This sculpture creates an alternative reality, as all art does, by duplicating the leafy pattern of the tree while reflecting everything within and around it, and bringing attention to the light, colour and movement that affects this moment in time. It is based on the poem "Sky Caught by Branches" by the famous Japanese Haiku poet Katakaji Szusuke.*

* the internationally renowned poet Katakaji Szusuke, who is celebrated for the deep spiritualism of her romantic yet minimalist poetry, has won numerous awards including the Pulitzer Prize, the Rome Prize, the Guggenheim Fellowship, and the Warsaw Chopin Competition. Some researchers have suggested that Katakaji Szusuke is in fact a nom de plume of the virtually unknown painter and sculptor Cathrin Hoskinson, but this seems unlikely.

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Gary Jacketti iii-25

“Weed”

ceramic, steel and wood

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Anne Huibregtse V-42
"Ironherd"
steel

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Judith Johnson V-43
“Dow/Tao
fabric

We are out of step with nature. We are a society at a crossroad. Can we stop the slide down the road of giant global international corporations, choosing paths of gross materialism which in time will fail us? Or, we can contemplate another way.

The Tao represents one other way...not a religion or even a path. It is about this life on our earth- the hear and now of life. Not confrontational but balanced and rather circuitous, as in nature. An ancient way for anyone to explore.

A woodland setting allowing space and peace for contemplation.

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Elena Kalman iv-34
"TREE VEIL"
found metal, computer disks

Installation by Elena Kalman

The decoration of trees, particularly the decoration of living trees in a natural setting, has a history that extends to Roman times, when celebrants draped trees with gold and silver during Saturnalia.

The oak is an enduring symbol of strength, endurance and a long, fruitful life. Celtic Druids used to worship oaks, and when the Chartres Cathedral replaced an oak grove formerly worshiped by the Druids, it incorporated oak motives into its stone carvings. In Shakespeare’s Henry VIII, a messenger says of a death:

But Hercules himself must yield to odds
And many strokes, though with a little axe,
Hew down and fell the hardest-timber’d oak.

Human strength is like the strength of an oak tree: it can endure almost all, but not all.
Jewish cemeteries in Europe have stone monuments shaped like trunks of oak trees with cut-off branches, symbolizing the interrupted lives.

My Tree Veil installation makes a modern attempt to decorate a solitary oak tree in the middle of a meadow. The aim of the installation is to attract a sort of worshipful attention to the oak.

I decorated the tree with scraps of found metal in gold and silver shades, reminiscent of Saturnalia traditions. Lightweight perforated sheets and weaved wire screens are transparent and lightly veil the tree. The golden orbs are computer memory disks, now re-purposed into a very old technology: wind chimes. I left all the branches, even the dead ones, intact, intermingling with the metal veil.

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Dana Kenn i-4

“Tree House”

tree boughs
My entry this year, the second in a series of unique accessible spaces, is created especially for the Saunders Farm Exhibition. This piece speaks to the familiar childhood icon, the Tree House. I enjoy the clever juxtaposition of the name of a thing, and creating somewhat of a magical twist, if you will, on what we collectively think it is supposed to be. And though tree houses are usually super-imposed shelters built up into trees, they are rarely ground based retreats literally formed from trees. Be welcome, Enter, Sit, Look Around, Ponder, Relax. Enjoy

 

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Larissa Killough v-41
"Swing Free"
rope and wire

Fear has the power to take hold of us and not let go. Fear can also empower us to break free from this hold.

A noose represents several actions deeply rooted in fear. I chose to take this symbol and turn it into a swing.

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Matthew Kinney iii-18

Sawn enough
wood

Enough said, I’m looking forward to moving on in life. Though I very much enjoyed installing it- it’s time to move on and to see what is next!

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Grace Knowlton iii-17
"untitled"

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Kevin Laverty iv-30
"untitled"
yellow rope/black frame

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Eliza Littrel

Performance

 

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Jim Lloyd iii-20
“Bipolar Prominences”

welded metal

Ferrosynthesis takes its directions from many sources, especially those deep within our understanding of nature. Here we see two perhaps opposing or perhaps attracting forces in action. The naturally rusted right and the painted left. Are they opposing or are the embracing? With the slow room temperature kinetics of Ferrosynthesis it’s hard to tell. At some point the appearance of solar prominences, a feature of the source of all life on earth, came into the process and was visually replicated, but the left-right dark-light dichotomy prevails.

 

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Lynn Mayocole iii-21

"T(R)EATS for SAUNDERS COWS"

molasses, trace mineral salt, 27 breast casts

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Sharon Nakazato ii-16

"Wind Flag Prayers: Earth, Water, Skies, Plants, Animals, Us"
Prayer flags are flown on high places in the Himalayas so the wind can carry their blessings to all travelers, known and unknown.

I believe art is a mutual creation of the artist and the appreciators, who bring all their imagination, experience, thought, and subtle feeling into the work and give it greater life. I hope those who pass by or under these flags will receive and carry blessings to all the Earth and we who inhabit it.

The holes let the wind breathe free and the crystals reflect back the light.

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Michael Anthony Natiello ii-10
"Fruit Loop: dedicated to the passions of Henry Hudson".
wood, fabric, and paint

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Mick McGuire iii-22

"Inverse ColorScapes"
Wood and acrylic

The art becomes part of the environment and the environment is the art.

This piece is a place for viewing the landscape differently. Look at your surroundings as monochromatic imagery – a black and white photograph- remove the color, add the color,
Let the light establish contrast. Change the way you perceive…

Become the artist in the art.

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C. Michael Norton ii-15

"GARRISON 2"
plaster, hemp & wood

Garrison 2 is built into a tree at Saunders Farm, creating my work as an extension of the natural site. Covering a long arching branch of a tree with hemp and plaster (it is protected underneath with a plastic wrap) this work cantilevers, starting about 16 feet off the ground, through a massive fork in the trunk of this stately tree and runs approximately 21 feet long. I am interested in the meeting of abstraction and the anthropomorphic, as this work alludes to organic formations such as prehistoric fossils and Spanish moss among other possibilities.

 

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Leslie Pelino v-44

“Morning Mourning Shooting Star”

Recycled mixed media

My concept started out as a flower, but upon processing the sad news of two sudden violent shooting deaths experienced by my friend, this flower turned into a star. I found myself working on the piece only in the mornings because of the heat, my dog Rocco every morning by my side. Just about as this piece was nearly completed my beloved dog died, leaving me too sad to work. The prompting of my husband to try to “keep busy” and the nearing show date brought me back to the completion of this artwork. He was right, I always use my artwork as the coping tool for my life and this time too I found peace, out working in and for nature, taking the journey toward greener pastures.

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Dejan Pejovic iv-32

“Father & Son”

Reinforced concrete

5' x 4' x 5'

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Michel Poast v-40
Color Music Fence Sonata

paint and split wood

Color Music

Color Music, conceived and composed by Michael Poast, is an alternative form of musical notation comprised of colors and shapes. The performers derive all dramatic and musical sound from the visual scores. For example: lemon yellow represents high pitched, bright sound; red indicates mid-range pitch and fast pulsating rhythms, shape delineates musical line and different types of brushstrokes evoke rhythmic variations. Color Music speaks to audiences on multiple sensory levels simultaneously.
This installation, Color Music Fence Sonata (2009) is presented in a linear format of painted split wood beams that "unfold-in-time" similar to pages of a music score. It is a site-specific music score using color as notation. For further information and Bio on Michael Poast visit www.theplayerstheatre.com, who is currently composer in residence.

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David Provan i-7
"
T House
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Wood

“T-House is an updated and miniaturized version of a traditional Japanese teahouse.

As with the original, T-House serves as a vantage-point from which to observe both the view and the viewer.”

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Lise Prown & Curt Belshe v-47

“Wildlife Management Part 1: Charmed”

Plastic nature charms

Our work “Wildlife Management Part 1: Charms” depicts New York wild life such as robins, squirrels, deer, ticks, mosquitoes and raccoons using a pixilated digital video game style of representation. These expressly “cute and cartoon-like charms will exist in extreme contrast to the surrounding natural environment. Many of these animals live on a collision course with humans causing impact on people daily via contact of different kinds i.e. rabies, Lyme disease, car accidents etc.
The cartoony style of this piece points to point towards the human tendency to anthropomorphize nature and to point out the gap between our media saturated lives and actual nature. We are on a collision course with the nature world and it is always changing our perceptions of nature, landscape and location. At the same time we function at an increasingly great remove from the natural world. This piece points to this disconnect.

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Sheilah Rechtschaffer v-38

Camouflage Redux

printed material/digital camouflage pattern

Camouflage is a form of deception.

Camouflage is the method which allows an otherwise visible subject or object to remain indiscernible from the surrounding environment.

The common camouflage used for the military
is now a digitalized print. In different colors depending on
geographical location; tropical, desert, woodland.

The real camouflage is out there of course and hidden in
the landscape, lost in the crowd. In returning to this theme in the tranquil setting of Saunders Farm, I think about war and peace. Even walking in paradise one cannot see.

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Herman Roggeman iii-24

"untitled"
Steel, lead, mixed media

After attending the Flemish Art Academy, Herman emigrated to the United States from Belgium. Here he learned to weld and discovered the wonders of direct metal sculpture.

He is the founder of Collaborative Concepts and the Saunders Farm Project.

He and his son own Metconix in Beaconwhere they fabricate individualized works for clients.

Herman hopes to express the joy he finds in the natural world through his works.

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Sonia & Dakin Roy v-37

“Tree Dressing”

yarn, foam, spray paint

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Taher Shafie vi-52

“Image of Ishtar.”

Fired clay and glaze

23.5 in H x 7.5 in W

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Kevin Stapp vii-56

Words Fail

Nature

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Jim Thomson vii-55

“Editorial Quill”

White plastic feather vane

As a reclamation artist, I wondered where old political signs went after they died. Ergo some of them have gone into the making of the Editorial Quill. It has been a delightful challenge for me to discover and release the SPIRIT in the found objects and material I work with.

 

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Alex Uribe v-45

“Spring”

PVC coil

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Eva Whorley ii-8
"Tread Tired"
tires

The theme of this sculpture is the re-use of a discarded material as art. Tires are one of our worst nemeses’ environmentally and are not very easily recycled. By turning them into art they can, at least, serve an artistic purpose while they stand, perhaps for centuries waiting to decompose or be recycled. This sculpture is made of recycled/reused re-bar tires I picked up off the road as well as from my local mechanic. This sculpture is intended for cows to lean, children to climb and people to sit if they wish

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Max Yawney vii-54

"untitled:
wood, paint

 

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Grey Zeien iii-23
“Trinity”

Colorful flashing shrub

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