Collaborative Concepts
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2006

 

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John Allen
John Allen is a little known, essentially not-for profit, artist who lives nearby and makes a living doing something else.

 

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Emile Alzamora


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A. Eric Arctander
aerica@optonline.net
Bryant Pond
Putnam Valley
New York, 10579
845-528-1797

top: Cow Licks
bottom: Red Cabin, Green Field (Sky Varies),
a collaboration with Herman Roggeman

My art is site specific placements that reveal the specialness of place. The subject of this quality may be derived from cultural, historic,
mythic or natural aspects latent within the site.

For Collaborative Concepts Art Project at Saunders' Farm I have created a placement, COW LICKS, honoring the herd of 40 Black Angus steer.

 

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Nancy Bauch

nancybauch@yahoo.com

Rumi's Field
porcelain, glass, waxed linen, monofilament

I wanted to define an actual physical space that could invite the viewer to experience the following concept by the poet Rumi:
"Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing there is a field. I'll meet you there."

This work begins as a dotted line of white porcelain bells composed in a rhythm that relates to the landscape. It leads the viewer up a hill from the road through four pastures and one woods to a space along the top ridge. Along the way, it tempts the viewer's involvement which becomes part of the work. In return, this response offers back a kind of lightness of being...away from the usual trance of thinking. Upon reaching the end of the path, the bells begin to percolate. The viewer finds themselves surrounded by a protective circle of bells that frame a surprise glimpse of the river. This is Rumi's field. It is a neutrally safe space place meant for personal reflection and private reckoning.

Part of Nancy Bauch’s working studio has been the land that surrounds her house. For years she has walked a trail that was originally an old road that had become completely overgrown. Maintaining this path has been an on going dedication and as time has passed she began to see areas that lent themselves to meditative spaces and began to define places for pauses. What she introduces into the land does not dominate or overwhelm the existing landscape, but instead tries to work with it, producing a new experience.

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Jo-Ann Brody

http://www.jo-annbrody.com
http://www.thestudiony-alternative.com
http://www.maxwellfinearts.com
http://www.hvcca.com/auction/artists.html

Cluster of Women
10 colored cement figures from 48 - 63" tall

Brody's sculptures of women in cement and clay can be seen at Maxwell Fine Arts, Peekskill NY and at Ceres Gallery NYC in early 2007. Recent group exhibitions include shows at Yonkers, Peekskill, the Studio in Armonk NY, and Robert Miller Gallery, NYC and Peekskill Project 2005. Her ceramic books were at Castillo Gallery in Chicago, the Third National Women’s Book Exhibition in North Carolina, and in the traveling exhibition “Women of the Book,” which crossed the USA from 2000 to 04.
Brody's woman stand strong, defiant and proud. They talk to one another and to the viewer who will pause long enough to hear.

 

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Robert Brush

photo by Louise Woehrle

The Score (or a reworking of Goya's "The Shootings of May 3rd")
exterior latex paint, plywood, pressure treated wood, vinyl.
104.72"x 135.82".

brush58@optonline.net
22 High Street
Beacon, NY 12508
845-661-9261

ROBERT BRUSH, Producer. Of nothing. Depicting nothing, imbued with expectation. In my background of theater, performance, and set design, I deconstructed known elements of plays and created altered versions of anticipated events. This conceptual approach continues in my current installation work as I focus on the familiar, the repetitive, and question its inherent security and authority. I overlay my work with an inquiry about adolescence, especially as an “American” idiom that extends to the environment. It is informed with the contradictions of limitlessness and restriction, freedom and unease, communality and competition, beauty and impending decay. It references the waiting world - from a playground, to a glacier, from a commercial strip, to a Native American Shell Mound. And teenage perception and experience, ratcheted up by hormones, rebellion, hubris, doubt, parental dictates, and peer group pressure. I rely on the viewer to participate in the creation and development of the work, and grapple with the question: “what is this?”

 

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Tom Faulkner

131 East 66th Street, New York, N.Y. 10021, 212-288-2784, e-mail: metrohope@mac.com


JAMBOREE, is a site specific installation created to rest atop the farm's historic stone and concrete reservoir enclosure. The work consists of twelve tents, each painted half black and half white, each representing one of the great world religions; a pole supporting a pennant symbol of each religion and a pair of binoculars; and piles of throwable rock weapons.

Having studied at the San Francisco Art Institute and received his MFA from Pratt Institute, Tom Faulkner is a sculptor whose work has been shown at the Boston Architectural Center, Socrates Sculpture Park, The Sculpture Center, and The City Gallery of New York. He has also done work at sites as diverse as Bryant Park (Public Art Fund), the Ethical Culture Society of New York, the Manhattan Psychiatric Institute, and the Anglican Cathedral in Madrid. His currrent Stations Project has been installed in Minneapolis, Sheridan (Wyoming), Salt Lake City, and is now heading to Pasadena and the West Coast. His work will be featured in the winter exhibition of Wyoming artists at the Ucross Foundation.

 

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Sarah Haviland

sculpture.org
maxwellfinearts.com
thestudiony-alternative.com

sarahhaviland@earthlink.net
PO Box 178
Crompond, NY 10517

Aviary
Sarah Haviland has been a member of the Peekskill artist community for thirteen years.
Her sculptures and installations have been exhibited widely in NYC and nationally, and her public sculpture
"Trio" is in the collection of Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, NJ.

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Anne Huibregtse

Walking Fence
Anne Huibregtse has been making cow sculptures and exhibiting them for a number of years. This may be the first showing of her work where cows are welcome.

 

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Gary Jacketti
jacketti@optonline.net
bulldog studios
211 fishkill ave
beacon, ny 12508

Pasture Ghosts
is a sound installation. It is not concerend with the visual, rather focusing on the subtle sound created when the wind influences the slabs of fired clay.

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Kirsten Kucer



Flowers for Mencius

 

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Michael Anthony Natiello

natiello1@juno.com

Queen Anne’s Lace: a mandala for cows (formerly known as the Petri Dish)

Although many would refer to this sculpture as grass circles or crop circles it is not to be thought of as such. Where crop circles are purported to be created by a “higher being or life form” these Grass Sculptures are intended to help the viewer get closer to energy greater than the self. Similar in function to a mandala, Zen garden, labyrinth or maze the purpose of the grass sculpture is one of centering and orientation (within the self, the environment/place, community, world and cosmos). Further more it is meant to represent a pure truth and as such is an aid to meditation. In this case the sculpture is intended mainly for the Black Angus to utilize and ponder the ontological questions that cows often mull over while chewing their cud.

Visually the sculpture is influenced by the existing landscape and land use. Queen Anne’s Lace flower (growing in the hay fields) has informed the design and composition of this grass sculpture. The piles of hay placed at random yet seemingly regular intervals were inspired by the ones seen scattered throughout the farm. They just happen to coincide with the cardinal points and the structure of the Queen Anne’s Lace. Cows are encouraged to munch on the hay as they meditate on their existence.

The process is informed by lawn mowing and landscaping practices where visual texture is achieved on a grass area by alternating the direction of the lawn mower and blade rotation. Additional texture and patterning is achieved by raising or lowering the mower deck similar to the technique barbers use with hair clippers. Tools of choice for this sculpture were a scythe, John Deere mower, Chevy Tracker and a Dodge Turbo Power Ram (Cummins diesel engine).
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Born in Edison, New Jersey, the artist spent much of his formative years in the Garden State. In 1991 a quest in search of the Jersey Devil prompted him to pursue a career in art, in lieu of joining the clergy. He currently resides in the Hudson Valley’s Highland Mountains in Garrison New York.

 

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Jim Nolan

http://www.jimnolan.info

The Inside/Out
12' x 12' x12'
wood, spraypaint.

In my studio practice I am engaged in a direct dialogue with the minimalist-post-minimalist work of the 60’s and 70’s.
I use this period of art history as a touchstone to ground my work and try, in my own way, to work within it’s tenets.

Following the tradition of minimalism, I have made a conscious decision to limit the materials that I work with.
I have chosen to use what might be found in a typical basement, attic, or garage-- scraps of paneling, plywood, carpet,
old basketballs, beer cans, etc.- the detritus of Americana.

 

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Gary O'Connor

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Dakin Roy

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 Casandra Saulter

The external conditions attached to art events require bio's. Making art, collecting art or buying it, experience-discipline-truth and the story could very well end there. Artists brought me into a world which was even more about choices than it was about art. I was born in Queens New York in the 1950's and left art college after two years. Exhibition and sales of my work began in the 1970's. I have a healthy list of private clients and do commissions, which I encourage. Collaboration about personal details is like feeding an already fat virgin. Living with art can be a dimensional feast, living with art that is about you is good story telling. I've shown in and out of Manhattan, in corporate space, private space, open studios and in group shows. Some of my work has been sold in Italy which was home for four years. 2005 and 2006 was an up-grade in my collectability: I received Artist's fellowship, Gottlieb Foundation and Max's Kansas City grants and made a celebrity sale. I have a studio in Beacon at Bulldog studios and I live in New York city's Greenwich Village.

the title of my piece is: HOME

 

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Gregory Slick
Tick
Aluminum, screws, steel wire mesh, wood, foam. 2006.

Creating tension between perception and actual heft, solidity and prop-like illusion is just part of the strategy behind Gregory Slick’s sculptures. Freely referencing both aeronautical design and sprawling organic forms within a single piece, Slick’s artisanally crafted aluminum constructions aim to push beyond what metal sculpture is expected to look like. A curating artist in several art projects, Slick lives and works in NYC and Beacon, NY.

 

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Liz Surbeck Biddle
breadbox@bestweb.net
142 Mount Airy Road
Croton-on-Hudson, N.Y. 10520
(914) 271-4666
lizbiddle.com

Aberration
Concern about invasive species, anomalous growths, abnormal life forms and changing climate are a growing worry today. This piece hints at ominous threats that are taking place in the natural order that we have lived with for ages past.

 

 

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Kathleen Sweeney
Kathleen Sweeney is a media artist and writer whose work has been funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, Film Arts Foundation, Media Alliance and Putnam Arts Council. Recent video art exhibitions include the Los Angeles Center for Digital Art; Centro de Arte de Sevilla, Spain; Diva Digital Video and Art Fair, New York; and the Van Brunt Gallery, Beacon, NY. Her book, Maiden USA: Girl Icons Come of Age, will be published in Fall 2006.

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Alex Uribe
Havens Gatea
stone & wood. 100' X 12'.

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Terry Fugate-Wilcox
5 on 7 by 20
hemlock & weather.

bio: moma, guggenhiem, wadsworth antheneum, albright knox, national gallery australia, pantheon italy, smithsonian.

 

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Terry Fugate-Wilcox
5 on 7 by 20
hemlock & weather.

bio: moma, guggenhiem, wadsworth antheneum, albright knox, national gallery australia, pantheon italy, smithsonian.

 

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William Zingaro
wzingaro@verizon.net
45 Fair St NY 10516
845 265 6127

U in the Country
steel, 6'x8'x 2'.

 

_______________________________________________The Artists of 2006_____________________________________________________

John Allen
Justin Allen
Emile Alzamora
A. Eric Arctander
Nancy Bauch
Jo-Ann Brody
Robert Brush
Diana Carulli
Peter Clark
Shasta Crombie
Tom Faulkner
Sarah Haviland
Anne Huibregtse
Peter Iannarelli
Gary Jacketti
Judith Johnson
Thom Joyce
Matthew S. Kinney
Grace Knowlton
Kirsten Kucer
Pat Laltrella
Michael Anthony Natiello
Jim Nolan
Gary O'Connor
Toni Putnam
Jill Reynolds
Herman Roggeman
Dakin Roy
Casandra Saulter
Gregory Slick
Liz Surbeck Biddle
Kathleen Sweeney
Alex Uribe
Terry Fugate-WIlcox
William Zingaro

 

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